Standard Features Missing in Opera – I-Beam Mouse Cursor/Pointer when Hovering over Text in a Web Page

Today's standard feature that Opera is missing is the showing of the I-Beam mouse cursor (cursor: text; in css) when hovering over text (even non-editable text) in a web page.

In browsers, the I-Beam cursor indicates whether the text on a web page is selectable and *or* editable.

All other browsers have supported this for years. Opera just shows the arrow mouse cursor.

Chrome and Safari support the I-Beam cursor even better. They show the I-Beam when selecting link text while Firefox and IE show the link hand pointer.

Edit: Opera 11.60+ has this now.

Some people are upset that there's no way to change it back to the old way though. Some also think that using the I-Beam for selectable text is wrong. In response to that, I submit:

Mozilla condiders the Ibeam a selection cursor. See here here, here and here.

The W3C considers it a selection cursor too (It's under the "Selection Cursors" section). See here and here."Indicates text that may be selected. Often rendered as a vertical I-beam."

This says it's for editable text, at least. But, it doesn't say that it can't be just for selectable text too. Besides Windows Explorer and IE use it for just selectable text.

7 Replies to “Standard Features Missing in Opera – I-Beam Mouse Cursor/Pointer when Hovering over Text in a Web Page”

  1. Originally posted by Swapnil99pro:For people who don’t like the new cursor, see-Thanks. There a few issues with that as mentioned in the thread.* It’s called a “User Stylesheet’ or “User CSS”.* Naming it user.css and putting it in the program files directory to rely on the default path for the global user stylesheet isn’t really the best.Putting the file in your user space somewhere and going to “Ctrl + F12 -> advanced -> content -> style options” and setting “My Style Sheet” or setting it via Local CSS File directly would be better.* User CSS is for overriding a page’s styles. Browser CSS File is for overriding Opera’s default styles *before* the page’s styles. In this case, one probably wants to override Opera’s defaults, not the page’s as some pages might have a good reason to change the cursor.* Mentioned elsewhere, it’s not a perfect solution. But, at least it seems to be good enough for most.

  2. Originally posted by burnout426:It’s called a “User Stylesheet’ or “User CSS”I can’t edit my post now.Originally posted by burnout426:Naming it user.css and putting it in the program files directory to rely on the default path for the global user stylesheet isn’t really the best.I know this but if you see the person who opened that thread – then you would notice he was really disinterested with Opera. At that time if I had said to find out his Opera installation directory and place it in it, he might not be interested in finding out anything. Some things are done according to mood of the user.Originally posted by burnout426:Browser CSS File is for overriding Opera’s default styles *before* the page’s styles.Thanks for this tip.Originally posted by burnout426:But, at least it seems to be good enough for most.That’s the closest match to a perfect solution for the time being.

  3. Originally posted by Swapnil99pro:Browser CSS File is for overriding Opera’s default styles *before* the page’s styles For example, if Opera’s default style sheet doesn’t have the correct style for an element like other browsers, you can patch Opera in most cases. You just can’t have different styles for quirks/standards mode (I made a proposal to do so, but those that make the decision shot down the proposal) and you obviously can’t fix conditions/workarounds that aren’t handled by css.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *